E for Effort

I wouldn’t have the heart to tell poor little fracturedskull9 the truth about his own spelling. Good try, little buddy!

fracturedskull9

  • Anonymous

    Seems like the only fractured skull here is his own….. Poor kid probably got dropped as a baby…..

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001412262160 Kyle Ohgodbees

    I don’t want to think about what getting teabagged over and over again by a 13 year old is like.

  • http://twitter.com/MGaceman Darren Harris ✔

    He’s a 13 year old blue waffle? Ewww, although, that would explain why he would tell someone to “fined a dushbag”, whatever that is.

  • http://twitter.com/Authentic_EI Emran Ismail

    “he’s climbin in your windows
    he’s snatchin your people up
    tryna rape em so y’all need to
    hide your kids, hide your wife
    hide your kids, hide your wife
    hide your kids, hide your wife
    and hide your husband
    cuz they’re rapin errbody out here
    you don’t have to come and confess
    we’re lookin for you
    we gon find you
    we gon find you
    so you can run and tell that,
    run and tell that
    run and tell that, homeboy
    home, home, homeboy”

  • http://blogs.got-rave.com/sputter sputtertoo

    Probably akin to being smacked by a rough leather glove, over and over. :p

  • Anonymous

    This is why 13yr olds shouldn’t be allowed near a gaming console until they can make Coherrent sentences

  • http://twitter.com/DukeSkath Eric S. Piotrowski

    “This is why 13yr olds shouldn’t be allowed near a gaming console connected to the internet.” FTFY.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jim-Darkmagic/100000448452808 Jim Darkmagic

    This is why parents should beat their children more often.

    “Johnny where you an asshole on the internet again? Fetch me my belt boy!

    No the one with the studs”

  • http://profiles.google.com/seemeisie Wendy Kearns

    You know, some people were actually beaten when they were children. Are you the kind of person that makes rape jokes too?

  • http://twitter.com/russacky James Russack

    Firstly: I am so super serious, do not google ‘blue waffle’ (I am super serial!)

    Secondly: Parents should be more informed about gaming and it’s effect on their children’s spelling and vocabulary i.e. every adjective and adverb replaced with an expletive.

    P.S. I am so sorry if you googled ‘it’ after I partially dared you to.

  • Anonymous

    There’s a difference between beating your children abusively and disciplining them when they do something bad. All this time-out bullshit isn’t going to work on every child. Some need a belt to their behind. Simple as that. I do believe you’re just trying to get a rise out of Mr. Darkmagic here. That would make you, in my opinion, a TROLL!!!!

  • http://twitter.com/JustPlainTweets Katie Schenkel

    It scares me that this kid/guy actually mentioned spelling and yet misspelled douchebag as “dushbag.” He obviously understands that spelling things correctly is important, and yet… “dushbag.”

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jim-Darkmagic/100000448452808 Jim Darkmagic

    Le sigh Wendy, yes I do know. I stand by my statement though, some kids could use a good thrashing from time to time….

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jim-Darkmagic/100000448452808 Jim Darkmagic

    well to be fair, the kids only 13 he probably doesnt even know what douching is..

    though he knows what teabagging is…and the blue waffle…and that making rape threats on the internet is funny….

    yeah Im going back to the belt as a good solution for this one.

  • http://twitter.com/minorchords Roger Gibson

    What kind of ticket would get someone a dushbag?

  • http://profiles.google.com/seemeisie Wendy Kearns

    That’s the first time I’ve ever been called a troll, even in
    jest. Usually I’m not so aggressive in my commenting. What can I say? I had a
    bad day, logged on for a laugh, and then was disappointed by abuse jokes in the
    comments (something I didn’t really expect from non-trolls here).

    The way Jim Darkmagic ‘joked’ made discipline sound like abuse. He said
    ‘parents should BEAT their children more’. With a studded belt.

    At the time, I didn’t have the patience to be polite.

  • Anonymous

    Well everyone has bad days. As for the troll bit, I’m part of the anti-troll revolution and sometimes I get to trigger happy or throw the name around loosely even in a jesting manner. I apologize if I offended you as that was not my intention. It’s more to just bring up my opinion on a subject. I’m not saying you’re wrong, I’m just saying what I think. Not that this would matter to someone most likely across the nation. I hope you come back. I really enjoy the site and love to see new faces and hear different opinions from my own. Hope you have a nice day. :)

  • http://profiles.google.com/seemeisie Wendy Kearns

    “some kids could use a good thrashing”

    Almost verbatim what my father would say before laying into us.

    A smack might work on a small child, but physical discipline rapidly becomes less
    effective as children grow up. At the age of 13 it mostly just makes you angry
    and teaches you to lie to your parents more effectively.

    In answer to your question: Yes. i’d say everyone has. That doesnt mean there isnt more that we should also be ashmed of. Like society still thinking thinking its ok to assualt children.

  • http://profiles.google.com/tyler.joyner.1995 JT Joyner

    The sender of such a message is a disrespectful and unintelligent buffoon. Laugh it off because they’re just idiots that lack lives. I may lack a life myself but I’m not disrespectful and I’m not that unintelligent :P

  • Anonymous

    There are child-rearing experts that will swear that no child will ever need to be struck in order to discipline them. That’s something I’d like to believe. I’ve only have the vaguest memory of being spanked, and the last time in particular, I realized that it didn’t hurt. I felt guilty about that and I told my dad that it didn’t hurt so he could properly punish me, and he was caught pretty off guard and just let it drop.

    When I got older, he would explain that he didn’t need to spank me. That I could be told to sit in a chair that I was already sitting in, but he said that I was in time-out, I would wail and cry like it was the worse possible thing that could happen to me.

    But clearly not all kids respond the same. Disapproval from my parents is a terrible thing for me to experience. Still, I’d like to think that every child can be raised to be a good person with enough diligence without resorting to spanking.

    But what if there are some that can’t? What if there’s a child that won’t change their behavior until they’re struck with a belt? Is that acceptable then? Is that good?

    Are you really teaching this child to be a good person or are you just teaching the child to fear punishment?

    It seems to me that people raised to follow rules to avoid punishment are ticking time bombs. These are the people who, when they see no punishment will come to them, will break the rules. I’m skeptical that you can really beat a person into being a good person.

    I understood that what @facebook-100000448452808:disqus said was a joke, and I can see the humor in it despite the real-world awfulness. I, too, will make jokes about the uglier, evil side of human nature: child-abuse, physical-assault, murder, rape, racism, sexism, et cetera, BUT I choose my audience carefully. I keep these jokes to people I know who would appreciate them and not misinterpret their use. I wouldn’t choose a place as public as this for a joke like that. Especially for a first post. I would also apologize to any I inadvertently offended.

    And still, I wouldn’t want to diminish any pain @google-bc12b568f09da04aa4475debcee9aff3:disqus had experienced, but I would also hope that she sees that a lot of humor stems from the misfortune of others. Someone may not like a joke about a kid being beat, but they’d laugh when Elmer Fudd shoots Daffy point-blank in his face.. Or may laugh when a dude gets hit in the nuts… Or even if someone just trips over something. Just because someone can find humor in misfortune doesn’t mean they promote the action.

    And I never thought Wendy was trying to be a troll. I thought she was someone who just had the wrong button pressed.

  • Anonymous

    I just stumbled onto this site and decided to look around a bit, and personally I’m a tad appaled, but being on the internet I guess it’s nothing to be surprised about. So, someone who has disrespect for other human beings and hasn’t been tought how to speak properly and with respect makes rude comments to you. What is the right thing to do? Share it online and look for people to help you insult the sad induidual behind the same veil of anonymity. Why insult this apparent 13 year old when basically everyone on the internet is more or less the same?

    I agree with Wendy, and it’s good to see a voice of reason among you all. A person becomes like this due to the environment they’re raised in and through what they’re tought. All kids are smart and if they see an adult be insulting they’ll feel alright doing so themselves, and why shouldn’t they if they see everyone else doing it without any resulting consequence, remorse, or even proper reasoning? Why should a kid get beat for it but not an adult? Insulting them back after they insult you also gives them more incentive to keep insulting. The best way to get rid of any problem is through talking and education, get to the source. In fact, it may be that this kid DOES get beatings, and that directly leads to his scorn towards others.

    When someone insults me online I block them, ignore them, and try not to respond to them (if I do I’ll say something like “That’s a terrible thing to say”, just generally try to respond without insult). Whatever I do, I just make sure I don’t make them feel rewarded in some way for their insults. If I can I even try to say something that may surprise them or open their eyes. I’ve gotten such people to appologize before. They want to be rewarded for their insults and they expect to be. I bet theres at least someone out there even hoping their insults will get posted to this site one day. Rather than be angry towards them, I really just feel sorry for them.

    Sorry if I’m being a party pooper for anyone here, but I had to post my thoughts. This isn’t a way I’d like to have fun personally, theres better ways to have fun out there. I think discussion about the psychology behind these things, solutions, and how people deal with them
    is more constructive.

    - Kulab

  • Anonymous

    Hmm, I don’t know how I missed OgreJohosephat’s post, that’s another voice of reason. Great post all around.

  • Anonymous

    I don’t totally agree with everything you say, but I really enjoy your perspective.  I hope you stick around and find that this place isn’t so bad. 

  • Anonymous

    Well…that turned into quite the conversation!

    [Disclaimer]: Opinions based on personal experience follow – I apologise in advance if I come across as an expert or use overly broad or specific terms, or as knowing any more about this than anyone else.

    I’ll throw in my two cents on the “child discipline” bit: Like others here, my dad especially was a fan of physical punishment.  Early on, it did what it was intended to – before I was capable of solid logic, it taught me which stuff not to do anymore.  Later on, it was more a general vent for his anger, and wasn’t necessarily tied to anything I’d done.  That, combined with years of bullying in school, have given me a somewhat unique perspective in this whole matter (not that I claim to be an expert, mind).

    I don’t advocate incessant physical discipline, but I don’t advocate a “passive parenting” approach either…those are the kids that turn out to be bullies, often.  As it stands, most of the kids playing online are doing so without much oversight from their parents, and they don’t appear to have any notion that the words they type and sentiments they convey on their TV or computer screen end up being read by a real human being on the other end.  In those instances, a good ass-whipping (to realize the experience), followed by a stern talking-to (to explain WHY it’s not acceptable behaviour), would likely go a long way to stopping some of this before it gets too malicious.

    It doesn’t always work, but I’ve found a fairly effective formula:
    1 – Tell the offending party to stop. If that doesn’t work:
    2 – Tell the offending party what you’ll do if they don’t stop.  If that doesn’t work:
    3 – Do it. (Make sure Step 2 is something you’re able to follow through with.)

    Sometimes a little retaliation does the trick – a lot of these kids do what they do because no one has ever tried to stop them.  I only used a physical approach twice during my childhood, and both were very deliberate messages directed at bullies – the first involved a single well-placed kick to the back of the leg after being pushed into a locker for the third time that morning, the second involved a set of red-hot test tube tongs clamped around the forearm of a kid who’d been jabbing me in the ribs with a metal pencil for about two weeks straight.  And both times the message was received with a clarity that put an end to the bullying.  (As an added bonus, both happened in places where a lot of people were around – watching a person make a statement, rather than running their mouth, and immediately following through on that statement, tends to make people reconsider pushing someone past the first two steps mentioned above.)  Your mileage may vary, but it’s worked well for me.

    In this case, the parents would have to step into the disciplinary role, as we don’t have the technology to reach through cables and smack people…yet.  As long as someone’s impressing upon these kids that a) It’s not cool to degrade and insult others for your own amusement and b) There are real-world consequences if you continue to do so.

    And yes, I realize this only deals with a certain segment of the individuals with chips on their shoulders…although a college kid’s dad driving 300 miles just to spank him in front of all his friends/Frat buddies/girlfriend might be more effective than you’d think.

    We all have our own experiences, and our own views on this – I guess we all end up finding our own way of dealing and/or coping with it.  There’s no single, simple solution for negativity.  By sharing our take, sure, some people may take offence (if we all agreed, the conversation wouldn’t happen), but someone may just stumble across something that works for them, something that helps them overcome what’s troubling them.

  • Anonymous

    Well…that turned into quite the conversation!

    [Disclaimer]: Opinions based on personal experience follow – I apologise in advance if I come across as an expert or use overly broad or specific terms, or as knowing any more about this than anyone else.

    I’ll throw in my two cents on the “child discipline” bit: Like others here, my dad especially was a fan of physical punishment.  Early on, it did what it was intended to – before I was capable of solid logic, it taught me which stuff not to do anymore.  Later on, it was more a general vent for his anger, and wasn’t necessarily tied to anything I’d done.  That, combined with years of bullying in school, have given me a somewhat unique perspective in this whole matter (not that I claim to be an expert, mind).

    I don’t advocate incessant physical discipline, but I don’t advocate a “passive parenting” approach either…those are the kids that turn out to be bullies, often.  As it stands, most of the kids playing online are doing so without much oversight from their parents, and they don’t appear to have any notion that the words they type and sentiments they convey on their TV or computer screen end up being read by a real human being on the other end.  In those instances, a good ass-whipping (to realize the experience), followed by a stern talking-to (to explain WHY it’s not acceptable behaviour), would likely go a long way to stopping some of this before it gets too malicious.

    It doesn’t always work, but I’ve found a fairly effective formula:
    1 – Tell the offending party to stop. If that doesn’t work:
    2 – Tell the offending party what you’ll do if they don’t stop.  If that doesn’t work:
    3 – Do it. (Make sure Step 2 is something you’re able to follow through with.)

    Sometimes a little retaliation does the trick – a lot of these kids do what they do because no one has ever tried to stop them.  I only used a physical approach twice during my childhood, and both were very deliberate messages directed at bullies – the first involved a single well-placed kick to the back of the leg after being pushed into a locker for the third time that morning, the second involved a set of red-hot test tube tongs clamped around the forearm of a kid who’d been jabbing me in the ribs with a metal pencil for about two weeks straight.  And both times the message was received with a clarity that put an end to the bullying.  (As an added bonus, both happened in places where a lot of people were around – watching a person make a statement, rather than running their mouth, and immediately following through on that statement, tends to make people reconsider pushing someone past the first two steps mentioned above.)  Your mileage may vary, but it’s worked well for me.

    In this case, the parents would have to step into the disciplinary role, as we don’t have the technology to reach through cables and smack people…yet.  As long as someone’s impressing upon these kids that a) It’s not cool to degrade and insult others for your own amusement and b) There are real-world consequences if you continue to do so.

    And yes, I realize this only deals with a certain segment of the individuals with chips on their shoulders…although a college kid’s dad driving 300 miles just to spank him in front of all his friends/Frat buddies/girlfriend might be more effective than you’d think.

    We all have our own experiences, and our own views on this – I guess we all end up finding our own way of dealing and/or coping with it.  There’s no single, simple solution for negativity.  By sharing our take, sure, some people may take offence (if we all agreed, the conversation wouldn’t happen), but someone may just stumble across something that works for them, something that helps them overcome what’s troubling them.

  • Anonymous

    Well…that turned into quite the conversation!

    [Disclaimer]: Opinions based on personal experience follow – I apologise in advance if I come across as an expert or use overly broad or specific terms, or as knowing any more about this than anyone else.

    I’ll throw in my two cents on the “child discipline” bit: Like others here, my dad especially was a fan of physical punishment.  Early on, it did what it was intended to – before I was capable of solid logic, it taught me which stuff not to do anymore.  Later on, it was more a general vent for his anger, and wasn’t necessarily tied to anything I’d done.  That, combined with years of bullying in school, have given me a somewhat unique perspective in this whole matter (not that I claim to be an expert, mind).

    I don’t advocate incessant physical discipline, but I don’t advocate a “passive parenting” approach either…those are the kids that turn out to be bullies, often.  As it stands, most of the kids playing online are doing so without much oversight from their parents, and they don’t appear to have any notion that the words they type and sentiments they convey on their TV or computer screen end up being read by a real human being on the other end.  In those instances, a good ass-whipping (to realize the experience), followed by a stern talking-to (to explain WHY it’s not acceptable behaviour), would likely go a long way to stopping some of this before it gets too malicious.

    It doesn’t always work, but I’ve found a fairly effective formula:
    1 – Tell the offending party to stop. If that doesn’t work:
    2 – Tell the offending party what you’ll do if they don’t stop.  If that doesn’t work:
    3 – Do it. (Make sure Step 2 is something you’re able to follow through with.)

    Sometimes a little retaliation does the trick – a lot of these kids do what they do because no one has ever tried to stop them.  I only used a physical approach twice during my childhood, and both were very deliberate messages directed at bullies – the first involved a single well-placed kick to the back of the leg after being pushed into a locker for the third time that morning, the second involved a set of red-hot test tube tongs clamped around the forearm of a kid who’d been jabbing me in the ribs with a metal pencil for about two weeks straight.  And both times the message was received with a clarity that put an end to the bullying.  (As an added bonus, both happened in places where a lot of people were around – watching a person make a statement, rather than running their mouth, and immediately following through on that statement, tends to make people reconsider pushing someone past the first two steps mentioned above.)  Your mileage may vary, but it’s worked well for me.

    In this case, the parents would have to step into the disciplinary role, as we don’t have the technology to reach through cables and smack people…yet.  As long as someone’s impressing upon these kids that a) It’s not cool to degrade and insult others for your own amusement and b) There are real-world consequences if you continue to do so.

    And yes, I realize this only deals with a certain segment of the individuals with chips on their shoulders…although a college kid’s dad driving 300 miles just to spank him in front of all his friends/Frat buddies/girlfriend might be more effective than you’d think.

    We all have our own experiences, and our own views on this – I guess we all end up finding our own way of dealing and/or coping with it.  There’s no single, simple solution for negativity.  By sharing our take, sure, some people may take offence (if we all agreed, the conversation wouldn’t happen), but someone may just stumble across something that works for them, something that helps them overcome what’s troubling them.

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